"Paranoia, Cyzophenia, Hysteria, Manicure reactions..”
Just an average staff meeting at the state mental hospital.
(Deep Jele Jai, 1959)

"Paranoia, Cyzophenia, Hysteria, 
Manicure reactions..”

Just an average staff meeting at the state mental hospital.

(Deep Jele Jai, 1959)

"I myself is absorbed do not know your term."
(Teen Bhubaner Pare, 1969)

"I myself is absorbed do not know your term."

(Teen Bhubaner Pare, 1969)

"This is called ? and Electro complex."
The only bright spot in one of the most sexist, medically inappropriate, and mainsplain-y Bengali film set-ups ever? A new, possibly better Bengali translation of Neo-Freudian theory. 
[Beth says: This film has been at the top of my to-watch list for awhile but after Hurano Sur I haven’t been able to bring myself to watch yet more medically inappropriate Suchitra Sen. But I’m SO INTRIGUED!]
(Deep Jele Jai, 1959)
(written and submitted by halfwaythruthedark)

"This is called ? and Electro complex."

The only bright spot in one of the most sexist, medically inappropriate, and mainsplain-y Bengali film set-ups ever? A new, possibly better Bengali translation of Neo-Freudian theory. 

[Beth says: This film has been at the top of my to-watch list for awhile but after Hurano Sur I haven’t been able to bring myself to watch yet more medically inappropriate Suchitra Sen. But I’m SO INTRIGUED!]

(Deep Jele Jai, 1959)

(written and submitted by halfwaythruthedark)

"Aah! Saro, you are going to be back dated."
The subtitles on this DVD are pretty awful, so it is with some hesitation that I guess that they meant “outdated.” 
(Teen Bhubaner Pare, 1969)

"Aah! Saro, you are going to be back dated."

The subtitles on this DVD are pretty awful, so it is with some hesitation that I guess that they meant “outdated.” 

(Teen Bhubaner Pare, 1969)

"English kiss?- Someone might spot us”
Oh the English, perverting culture with their brazen displays of emotion and affection.
(Heeralal Pannalal, 1978)

"English kiss?
- Someone might spot us”

Oh the English, perverting culture with their brazen displays of emotion and affection.

(Heeralal Pannalal, 1978)

"When she called my nameI saw her nose tip throbbing”
(Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal, 2014)
I guess that means it’s love.
(written and submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"When she called my name
I saw her nose tip throbbing”

(Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal, 2014)

I guess that means it’s love.

(written and submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"Identifying them were a parrotshrouded by heavenly drizzels”
(Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal, 2014)
(submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"Identifying them were a parrot
shrouded by heavenly drizzels”

(Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal, 2014)

(submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"An old vanity bagleft without stepping in”
No idea.
(Lucia , 2013)
(written and submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"An old vanity bag
left without stepping in”

No idea.

(Lucia , 2013)

(written and submitted by weeguttersnipe)

From pearlescentpink:

I shit you not ,the dude says “Let sleeping dogs lie” in English. I’m a native English speaker and I have never heard this phrase in my entire life. fyi the subtitles are correct i just thought this dialogue was the dumbest thing lmao. It’s from the movie Rakht. The scene is Drishti (Bipasha’s character) is trying to reopen the murder case and the dude is the lawyer.

Beth says: Fascinating! “Let sleping dogs lie” is a very well known and popular idiom in the English of which I am a native speaker. Your comment:1) is a great reminder that English is wild and wooly and full of variety, so it’s no wonder that subtitles that make sense in the English used by whoever wrote the subtitles might sound weird to a viewer somewhere else in the world, and 2) got me wondering about where the phrase comes from. A friend who is interested in language sent me this history of the phrase which says that similar expressions were used by Chaucer and even in the Bible.

From pearlescentpink:

I shit you not ,the dude says “Let sleeping dogs lie” in English. I’m a native English speaker and I have never heard this phrase in my entire life. fyi the subtitles are correct i just thought this dialogue was the dumbest thing lmao. It’s from the movie Rakht. The scene is Drishti (Bipasha’s character) is trying to reopen the murder case and the dude is the lawyer.

Beth says: Fascinating! “Let sleping dogs lie” is a very well known and popular idiom in the English of which I am a native speaker. Your comment:
1) is a great reminder that English is wild and wooly and full of variety, so it’s no wonder that subtitles that make sense in the English used by whoever wrote the subtitles might sound weird to a viewer somewhere else in the world, and
2) got me wondering about where the phrase comes from.
A friend who is interested in language sent me this history of the phrase which says that similar expressions were used by Chaucer and even in the Bible.

"What?–What what?”
This is the spirit animal of this tumblr when Govinda and his question marks are on vacation.
(Yeh Nazdeekiyan, 1982)
(submitted by BollyBubbles)

"What?
–What what?”

This is the spirit animal of this tumblr when Govinda and his question marks are on vacation.

(Yeh Nazdeekiyan, 1982)

(submitted by BollyBubbles)

Celebrating creativity, typos, and expert image-and-word juxtaposition in subtitles in Indian cinema, plus some perfectly good translations that just don't work in English.

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