"Identifying them were a parrotshrouded by heavenly drizzels”
(Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal, 2014)
(submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"Identifying them were a parrot
shrouded by heavenly drizzels”

(Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal, 2014)

(submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"An old vanity bagleft without stepping in”
No idea.
(Lucia , 2013)
(written and submitted by weeguttersnipe)

"An old vanity bag
left without stepping in”

No idea.

(Lucia , 2013)

(written and submitted by weeguttersnipe)

From pearlescentpink:

I shit you not ,the dude says “Let sleeping dogs lie” in English. I’m a native English speaker and I have never heard this phrase in my entire life. fyi the subtitles are correct i just thought this dialogue was the dumbest thing lmao. It’s from the movie Rakht. The scene is Drishti (Bipasha’s character) is trying to reopen the murder case and the dude is the lawyer.

Beth says: Fascinating! “Let sleping dogs lie” is a very well known and popular idiom in the English of which I am a native speaker. Your comment:1) is a great reminder that English is wild and wooly and full of variety, so it’s no wonder that subtitles that make sense in the English used by whoever wrote the subtitles might sound weird to a viewer somewhere else in the world, and 2) got me wondering about where the phrase comes from. A friend who is interested in language sent me this history of the phrase which says that similar expressions were used by Chaucer and even in the Bible.

From pearlescentpink:

I shit you not ,the dude says “Let sleeping dogs lie” in English. I’m a native English speaker and I have never heard this phrase in my entire life. fyi the subtitles are correct i just thought this dialogue was the dumbest thing lmao. It’s from the movie Rakht. The scene is Drishti (Bipasha’s character) is trying to reopen the murder case and the dude is the lawyer.

Beth says: Fascinating! “Let sleping dogs lie” is a very well known and popular idiom in the English of which I am a native speaker. Your comment:
1) is a great reminder that English is wild and wooly and full of variety, so it’s no wonder that subtitles that make sense in the English used by whoever wrote the subtitles might sound weird to a viewer somewhere else in the world, and
2) got me wondering about where the phrase comes from.
A friend who is interested in language sent me this history of the phrase which says that similar expressions were used by Chaucer and even in the Bible.

"What?–What what?”
This is the spirit animal of this tumblr when Govinda and his question marks are on vacation.
(Yeh Nazdeekiyan, 1982)
(submitted by BollyBubbles)

"What?
–What what?”

This is the spirit animal of this tumblr when Govinda and his question marks are on vacation.

(Yeh Nazdeekiyan, 1982)

(submitted by BollyBubbles)

"I’m going to Delhi tomorrowto pick my parents.”
[Beth says: There’s a seldom-visited shop near Chandni Chowk that stocks all the not-yet-found long-lost parents from 70s and 80s Hindi films. Nirupa Roy and Balraj Sahni are probably still back there.](Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania, 2014)
(submitted by BollyBubbles)

"I’m going to Delhi tomorrow
to pick my parents.”

[Beth says: There’s a seldom-visited shop near Chandni Chowk that stocks all the not-yet-found long-lost parents from 70s and 80s Hindi films. Nirupa Roy and Balraj Sahni are probably still back there.]

(Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania, 2014)

(submitted by BollyBubbles)

"He is cray. He’llchange sides anytime.”
This movie is waaaaay ahead of the slang times.
(Ram Jaane, 1995)

"He is cray. He’ll
change sides anytime.”

This movie is waaaaay ahead of the slang times.

(Ram Jaane, 1995)

"What makes you rump so much."
(Jay Jayanti, 1971)

"What makes you rump so much."

(Jay Jayanti, 1971)

"Who won the music world?""Bittles. Bittles. Bittles. Bittles.”  
Maria quizzes the von Trapp children on current events in the Bengali remake of Sound of Music (which is excellent). 
 (Jay Jayanti, 1970)

"Who won the music world?"
"Bittles. Bittles. Bittles. Bittles.”  

Maria quizzes the von Trapp children on current events in the Bengali remake of Sound of Music (which is excellent). 

 (Jay Jayanti, 1970)

"Won’t your fever subsideif I flow on you”
(Madhurey, 2004)
(subtmitted by weeguttersnipe)
NOTE: there are some other subtitles from this film in the archives here and especially here.

"Won’t your fever subside
if I flow on you”

(Madhurey, 2004)

(subtmitted by weeguttersnipe)

NOTE: there are some other subtitles from this film in the archives here and especially here.

[This entry is probably NSFW.]

"Dork."
"They all dumb and ugly as you?"

"What are you looking at?"
"A FOG." "What’s a FOG?"
"F-O-G, Fuckable Older Guy."
"Yeah? Just don’t get pregnant…"

Not Indian cinema, but paagal nevertheless. 

This is what happens when a movie has the wrong subtitles…such as a version of ‘Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban' (2004) with subtitles from the Dolph Lundgren movie 'Detention' (2003).

All credit goes to akusoft for finding these amazing subs. 

(written and submitted by Searching for the Sublime)

Celebrating creativity, typos, and expert image-and-word juxtaposition in subtitles in Indian cinema, plus some perfectly good translations that just don't work in English.

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